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Musings of a New York ADA

Falling Faster, barely breathing...

Name:
ada_casey_novak
Birthdate:
25 May 1976
External Services:
  • ada_casey_novak@livejournal.com
  • CaseyNovakADA AIM status
Casey was born in Baltimore, Maryland to Charles and Amelia Novak.

Her father Charles was a retired door gunner in the Marines, after receiving a Purple Heart for his service in Vietnam. After he was honorably discharged from the service, he went to law school, and settled at a firm in Baltimore, as an estate lawyer. Amelia Novak was your typical stay at home mom, taking care of the children, member of the bridge club, PTA president. She kept a tight grip on the household, while remaining nurturing to her children, carefully guiding them and showing them the way.

Casey is the younger of 2 children. Her older brother, Mark, was born 3 years before her. Her brother Mark was atypical as older brothers come, he was extremely protective over his baby sister, and watched over her like a hawk on the play ground and when they were in the same school.

As a child, Casey played a lot of sports, and developed her love of softball. She played on the school teams beginning in Elementary school. She is also extremely bright, always on the honor roll. She was also very popular among her friends.

When it came time to choose a college, she had no trouble getting into the University of Virginia, where she majored in Political Science. She received a scholarship for academics and softball, and she worked extremely hard throughout college. Her parents were not surprised when she applied to law school.

She was elated when she received her letter of acceptance to NYU’s law school, and she worked extremely hard throughout her career there. During her last year in law school, she clerked for her mentor, Judge Mary Clark, who was a judge in Manhattan. Judge Clark convinced her to apply to be an ADA in the district attorney’s office.

Needless to say, she was hired to work in the DA’s office in Manhattan in the White Collar crimes division. She enjoyed prosecuting these rich men who felt it was okay to take advantage of the little guys by depleting their 401Ks, and embezzling companies into the ground. It gave her great satisfaction to see the people who ran the companies riding off to prison when she was done with them.

The day she was reassigned to SVU, she was hesitant for what seemed like the first time in her life. She was not used to seeing the victims of violent crime, some of them alive, no less. She didn’t know if she was cut out for it. She’s still settling in, but does someone ever really settle into the Special Victims Unit?

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